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it was an experience


My now-deleted post was misleading. I didn’t actually experience bugs-crawling-out-of-laptop. I was just commenting on the possibility.

Anyways, tentatively optimistic news from Student Health: my bites very well look like they could be a mosquito, and I do not have scabies (lab horror stories I had to check out). I still will fight to get the treatment done on the apartment (because my things) and obviously heat treat the shit out of my precious clothes, but I don’t want to cry as badly anymore. Since I refuse to go back, though, I am staying in lab for hours on end today. I don’t hate it. I am glad I can go home and have a new place to move into when I come back.

In other news, I totally miss my vivid-as-hell Sunday night dream state, for all the wrong reasons.


Fear/anxiety/rage/despair all very high today. Upside: I have found a couch to sleep on tonight. Downside: Constantly in fear of being the asshole who is spreading bed bugs around.

Also the “friend” I originally subletted from is going to stay on my hit list forever. I never want to spend another summer here again


Bed bugs confirmed
Since the suspicion began (Friday) I have basically constantly been verging on tears but hopefully it will all be ok

In other news a cute thing happened ugh MY FEELZ. (Potatoes! Arrest! Wow!)


vogueltalia:

Osklen, fall 2013

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Filed in: art things goalz

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vogueltalia:

Osklen, fall 2013

cavetocanvas:

Roy Lichtenstein, Drowning Girl, 1963

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Filed in: art roy lichtenstein

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cavetocanvas:

Roy Lichtenstein, Drowning Girl, 1963

(Source: shoujonotes, via baestation)

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Filed in: french books

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"

The French have all kinds of worthwhile ideas on larger matters. This occurred to me recently when I was strolling through my museum-like neighborhood in central Paris, and realized there were — I kid you not — seven bookstores within a 10-minute walk of my apartment. Granted, I live in a bookish area. But still: Do the French know something about the book business that we Americans don’t?

[…]

France … has just unanimously passed a so-called anti-Amazon law, which says online sellers can’t offer free shipping on discounted books. (“It will be either cheese or dessert, not both at once,” a French commentator explained.) The new measure is part of France’s effort to promote “biblio-diversity” and help independent bookstores compete.

[…]

The French secret is deeply un-American: fixed book prices. Its 1981 “Lang law,” named after former Culture Minister Jack Lang, says that no seller can offer more than 5 percent off the cover price of new books. That means a book costs more or less the same wherever you buy it in France, even online. The Lang law was designed to make sure France continues to have lots of different books, publishers and booksellers.

[…]

What underlies France’s book laws isn’t just an economic position — it’s also a worldview. Quite simply, the French treat books as special. Some 70 percent of French people said they read at least one book last year; the average among French readers was 15 books. Readers say they trust books far more than any other medium, including newspapers and TV. The French government classifies books as an “essential good,” along with electricity, bread and water.

"

Amidst America’s Amazon-drama, NYT’s Pamela Druckerman reflects on what the book world can learn from the French.

Still, one has to wonder whether the solution to one monopoly (the commercial) can ever be another (the governmental), and whether that’s truly in the public interest – the “public,” of course, being first and foremost readers themselves. There’s something hypocritical about the proposition that the books are an “essential good” on par with electricity – what government would ever price-fix electricity and deny its citizen the most affordable electricity possible?

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sabot-cat:

"What’s your favorite album, or book?" "I really like Metamorphosis, I think it says a lot about the human condition and psyche." "Yeah I love Franz Kafka." "Oh no, I was talking about Hilary Duff’s debut album."  

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darkbluetile:

Matisse, young woman with head buried in arms, 1929

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Filed in: art minimalist

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darkbluetile:

Matisse, young woman with head buried in arms, 1929

nearlya:

Theo Firmo. Untitled (Porno), 2008, Marker on paper

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Filed in: art minimalist

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nearlya:

Theo Firmo. Untitled (Porno), 2008, Marker on paper

3 notes

I finished a toblerone bar. Im watching sex and the city.


Filed in: still haven't seen this

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I am weirded out when people from a long time ago in my life recognize me and do not comment on my changed appearance. That might be a compliment? But I look different and have morphed and grown into my personality, and maybe they cannot tell, but perhaps they could mention the haircut or the mode of dress or the attitude I wear. Today, an old classmate who I barely ever interacted with said he almost did not recognize me with longer hair. Back when I’d met him, I had a fresh cut, a physical attempt to transform my outward looks in order to change the vague luck or fortune that had taken a tumultuous hold of my life. Him commenting on my longer hair made me realize my luck change. It was a good moment; I smiled and chuckled, and it is impossible to convey to him the meaning his seemingly innocuous statement had. He is an older student and had a baby earlier this week with his partner. You think of that as change. You cannot immediately see it, but how real is that? As real as my longer hair. Earlier in the semester, a professor I had a few months back told me I looked different. Again, I mentioned my hair, not that we’d known each other right after the drastic cut, but it was the plainest reason I had to offer. She decided it was a better mood, an improved happiness. That is progress. Do not discount recognition of the smaller things.